Title I

Title I is one program under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. For more information, visit Title I legislation, regulations and guidance.

View guidance and reference materials here.

Part A, Basic

The purpose of Tennessee's federally funded Title I, Part A Program is to support local school districts improve teaching and learning for students in high-poverty schools so that these students meet the state's challenging content and performance standards.

Title I schools can operate either as targeted assistance or school wide. Targeted assistance schools identify students who are at risk of not meeting the state's content and performance standards and provide individualized instructional programs to the identified students so that they may meet the state's standards. Schoolwide programs use their funds to improve the entire program of the school so that all students are impacted.

Family and Community Engagement

No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Section 1118 requires each school district receiving Title I, Part A funds, to implement programs, activities and procedures designed to involve parents, families and the community. According to the Act, school districts must consult with parents of children participating in Title I programs to develop and carry out the parental involvement programs. School districts and schools, to the extent practicable, must provide full opportunities for the participation of parents with limited English proficiency, parents with disabilities, and parents of migratory children, including providing information and school reports in a format and, to the extent practicable, in a language parents understand.

Each school district must work with parents in jointly developing and distributing to parents of participating children a written parental involvement policy. The policy must be incorporated into the district's plan. Specifically, the policy must describe how the district will involve parents in the development of the district's NCLB plan and the process of school review and involvement. The Act requires the parental involvement policy to describe how the district will assist schools in planning and carrying out effective parent involvement activities to improve student academic achievement and school performance.

In addition, the district must coordinate and integrate activities under this policy with parental involvement strategies under other programs. The district must also conduct, with the involvement of parents, an annual evaluation of the parental involvement policy. The evaluation is then to be used to improve, and if necessary, revise the policy.

Part C, Migrant Education

The purpose of Tennessee's Migrant Education Program is to assist the state in supporting high-quality and comprehensive educational programs for migratory children to help reduce the educational disruptions and other problems that result from repeated moves.

The program aims at identifying and servicing children (between the ages of 3 and 21) who are, or whose parents or spouses are, migratory agricultural workers, including migratory dairy workers, or migratory fishermen, and who, in the preceding 36 months, traveled across division/state lines in order to obtain, or accompanied such parents or spouses, in order to obtain, temporary or seasonal employment in agricultural or fishing activity.

In providing services with migrant education funds, programs must give priority to migratory children who are failing or most at risk of failing, to meet Tennessee's challenging content standards and whose education has been interrupted during the regular school year.

The department distributes the subgrants to local education agencies for recruiting/advocacy and outreach activities for the migratory children and their families. Professional development programs for teachers, family literacy, integration of information technology into educational and related programs, and facilitating the transition of secondary school students to post secondary education or employment are some of the goals of this program.

Part D, Neglected and Delinquent

It is the purpose of the Neglected and Delinquent Education Program to:

  • Improve educational services to children in local and state institutions for neglected and delinquent children.
  • Provide such children and youth the services needed to make a successful transition from institutionalization to further schooling or employment.
  • Prevent at-risk youth from dropping out of school and provide dropouts and youth returning from institutions with a support system to ensure their continued education.

Forms & Resources

Program Grantees and Awards, Subpart 1 and 2

Monitoring Title I, Part D State Agencies 

Blue Ribbon Schools Award

On July 28, 2002, the Secretary announced that schools singled out for national honors will now reflect the goals of our nation's new education reforms for high standards and accountability. The Blue Ribbon Schools Program honors public and private K-12 schools that are either academically superior in their states or that demonstrate dramatic gains in student achievement.

Read about the 2013 Nominees here.

Additional Information

Distinguished Schools Recognition Program

Background Info --The purpose of the Title I Distinguished Schools Recognition Program is to identify schools that are:

  1. Ensuring that all children have access to effective instructional strategies and challenging academic content; and,
  2. Demonstrating success in ensuring that all children, particularly educationally deprived children, make significant progress toward learning that content.

A nominated school may be a schoolwide program or a targeted assistance school.

Each state may nominate two schools for national recognition:

  • One school will represent the state’s Title I schools that have exhibited exceptional student performance for two or more consecutive years.
  • One school will represent the state’s Title I schools that have made the most progress in significantly closing the achievement gap between student groups.

Additional information about this program is available at http://www.titlei.org/dsp.html.

The Title I Distinguished Schools Recognition Program for 2007-2008 will be using new procedures to determine the selected schools. In past years, Distinguished Schools applications were solicited from Title I schools.

The Department has decided that the Blue Ribbon and Title I schools programs have similar selection procedures. Because of this, there will no longer be a Title I Distinguished Schools application distributed for submission.  Instead, under the revised procedures, the staff of the Office of Federal Programs will determine the eligible schools for both programs by using screening criteria (test scores, AYP, poverty data, recognition history, etc.) and approach eligible schools for site visits.

The planned site visits by NCLB consultants and other federal programs staff will occur during September. Finalists will be determined and presented to the Commissioner for approval. The Title I Distinguished Schools will then complete required paperwork that will be forwarded to the national level.

National Title I Distinguished Schools are recognized at the annual NASTID Conference.

Last Update: July 21, 2014