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Division of Water Resources
William R. Snodgrass Tennessee Tower
312 Rosa L. Parks Avenue, 11th Floor
Nashville, Tennessee 37243
615-532-0625
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Hydrologic Determinations and Certification of Hydrologic Professionals - PPT by Dan Eagar for TSPE/ACEC Annual Meeting on Aug. 25, 2011

WPC Update - PPT by Saya Qualls for TSPE/ACEC Annual Meeting on Aug. 25, 2011

Water Pollution Permits Data Viewer now available for online public access

DataViewer pulls information from the same consolidated database TDEC regulatory staff uses to keep track of water related permit activity and status.

Regulatory Classification of Watercourses and Conducting Hydrologic Determinations

With the passage of Public Chapter Number 464, the Tennessee General Assembly amended the Tennessee Water Quality Control Act of 1977 to clarify the regulatory status of watercourses in Tennessee and to establish qualifications for persons who conduct hydrologic determinations. In this context, a hydrologic determination is the classification of a watercourse as either a stream or a wet weather conveyance. As required by the law, the division presented to the Tennessee Water Quality Control Board, at their September 2009 meeting, draft rules for implementation, proposed guidance on minimum qualifications for division staff who are responsible for making or reviewing wet weather conveyance determinations, and a draft guidance manual for conducting hydrologic determinations.

Aquatic Resource Alteration Permit (ARAP) Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

An Aquatic Resources Alteration Permit (ARAP) is required for projects that will physically alter surface waters of the state (streams, wetlands, lakes, etc.). Examples of alterations that may require an ARAP include dredging, bank sloping or stabilization, water withdrawals, wetland filling, and road and utility crossings of waters. A list of Frequently Asked Questions has been compiled for your assistance.

The Known Exceptional Tennessee Waters

The Division of Water Resources has compiled a partial list of exceptional Tennessee waters based on characteristics set forth in the regulation by the Tennessee Water Quality Control Board. In general, these characteristics are streams with good water quality, important ecological values, valuable recreational uses, and outstanding scenery. Wherever possible, the Division has utilized objective measures to apply these characteristics and the basis for each listing is provided.

Regional Characterization of Streams in Tennessee

Regional Characterization of Streams in Tennessee with Emphasis on Diurnal Dissolved Oxygen, Nutrients, Habitat, Geomorphology and Macroinvertebrates

2012 305(b) Report: The Status of Water Quality in Tennessee

Report on the general water quality of surface waters in Tennessee. Contains information about water quality, the assessment process, use support, causes and sources of pollution, and waterbodies posted due to human health risks.

EPA Approved Final Version Year 2010 303(d) List

An EPA approved final list of streams, rivers, reservoirs, and lakes that do not meet water quality standards in 2010. Provides pollutant information and TMDL prioritization.

EPA Approved Final Version Year 2008 303(d) List

An EPA approved final list of streams, rivers, reservoirs, and lakes that do not meet water quality standards in 2008. Provides pollutant information and TMDL prioritization.

Watershed Management Plans

Watershed Water Quality Management Plans are prepared in Year 5 of the watershed management cycle. These watershed plans include a general watershed description, water quality assessment summary results, inventory of point and nonpoint sources, water quality concerns voiced by citizens at public meetings, federal, state, and local initiatives, and management strategies. A public meeting is held to discuss the draft plans with local citizens, elected officials, and the regulated community.

Fishing and Bacteriological Advisories in TN

When streams or lakes are found to have significantly elevated bacteria levels or when fish tissue contaminant levels exceed risk-based criteria, it is the responsibility of the Department of Environment and Conservation to post warning signs so that the public will be aware of the threat to public health.

Probabilistic Monitoring of Streams Below Small Impoundments in Tennessee

This report describes the results of a probabilistic study of 75 streams below small impoundments and the effects of the impoundments on aquatic life, nutrients, dissolved oxygen, pH, iron, manganese, habitat, flow, and periphyton density in the downstream reaches.